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SEO Content Overview


To get the highest return on investment (ROI), your SEO content needs to be carefully curated. In some ways, it is significantly more important than graphics. With graphics, the impact is limited to a case-by-case basis as each user judges its relevance. With content, the impact is far-reaching as the major search engines prioritize its significant across wide swaths of users, potentially magnifying or diminishing your site traffic quickly. There are many factors to consider when writing or commissioning your site content, including: copy length, keyword density, keyword analysis, relevance, substance, and content quality.

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SEO Content

Copy Length

The first thing you need to know is that writing SEO content has drastically changed as the search engines have evolved — and it will continue to do so. Writing short articles or blog posts that are not directly relevant to your website or your business will not foolthe smarter search engines, thanks to recent algorithm updates. And we’re actually very supportive of this move because when we’re searching for information online...

SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content
SEO Content

Keyword Density

How often should you use your keywords within your copy? That depends. How relevant is your keyword to your topic? If the answer to the latter question is “very,” then the answer to the former question should also be “very,” without stuffing it into your content where it doesn’t make sense. As with everything SEO, there is an element of judgment needed...

SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content
SEO Content

Keyword Placement

Where you place your keywords is just as important as how often they’re used within a page—and there’s a big difference between the two. Above all your content must be relevant to your business and your website and your keywords should match. But your keywords should be peppered throughout the copy without stuffing them in where they don’t make sense...

SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content
SEO Content

Keyword Analysis

The road to your website all begins with a search. What words are people typing into the search box that help drive them to your site? Choosing your keywords is one of the most crucial steps in composing SEO content and content marketing depends on nuanced keyword analysis. You need to figure out what people are typing into search engines and how your competitors currently rank on the keywords you’re interested in targeting.

SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content
SEO Content

Relevance

Content relevance is significant to your audience and the search engine. A website’s content needs to appeal to the people searching for your product, service or offering. And the search engine needs to find that content for the user. Determining relevance is actually quite simple and can be summed up with the answer to one particularly ...

SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content SEO Content
SEO Content

Quality

To set yourself up in the best possible light with your audience and the major search engines, your content must be of high quality. Allocating extra time and resources to an article can be the difference between conversion success and conversion failure. With an ever-increasing content-hungry Internet audience, the competition for users’ attention will only become more...

Copy Length

The first thing you need to know is that writing SEO content has drastically changed as the search engines have evolved—and it will continue to do so. Writing short articles or blog posts that are not directly relevant to your website or your business will not fool the smarter search engines, thanks to recent algorithm updates. And we’re actually very supportive of this move because when we’re searching for information online, we’re searching for value. And we want to be able to find what we’re looking for.

Cheating on copy length or originality is no longer a shortcut to winning the search game. If a search engine detects that you’re posting copy just for the sake of having fresh copy on your site, you’ll be quickly demoted on the SERPs. As a result, writing short, irrelevant articles or blog posts about somewhat relevant topics doesn’t work anymore. There isn’t an exact length that an article has to be, but aiming for 500-1,000 words is a good rule of thumb. That gives you just enough copy length to compose an informative, yet not bloated, article.

What’s the takeaway? Embrace big content. Don’t be afraid of long, informative articles and blog posts. Feel free to compose compelling content in articles that provide new insights with clear information. This information is more likely to be shared, emailed, and linked to. But be careful to only write until you’re done providing value. When you run out of interesting, compelling things to say, you’re done.

Another tip is to create in-depth guides on topics that the visitors to your site would be interested in rather than throwing together forgettable 250-word posts. While embracing big content naturally requires you to allocate more writing time, it’s one of the most profound ways a website can cut through the noise in content marketing.

Keyword Density

How often should you use your keywords within your copy? That depends. How relevant is your keyword to your topic? If the answer to the latter question is “very,” then the answer to the former question should also be “very,” without stuffing it into your content where it doesn’t make sense.

As with everything SEO, there is an element of judgment needed. That being said, a good rule of thumb is to have your keywords immersed into your copy at a rate of about 1% to 3%. That means for every 100 words in your content, you want to use one to three keywords. This is essentially the measurement called keyword density, or KD for short.

This brings up the question, “What is considered a keyword?” That’s something that you’ll determine after a comprehensive keyword analysis. However, there’s another tier to consider when you’re looking at your keyword density: long-tail vs. short-tail keywords. This is something we discuss more when we talk about keyword density in more depth, but essentially a long-tail keyword is a more specific version or phrase of your keywords. For example, if you’re trying to rank for high-end restaurants in your area, your long-tail keywords are likely “high-end restaurant in [your city].” If your short-tail keyword is “restaurants in [your city],” you’ve used 3-5 keywords, depending on which version you used. This situation is why it’s best to maintain a range of approximately 1-3% keyword density, all the while using a blended average of long-tail and short-tail keywords.

As with everything “search,” it’s important to take a qualitative, critical look at each keyword density ratio. If 1% seems too high, it might very well be too high. By over-mentioning a keyword and making an article seem spammy, regardless of its KD, it’s not engaging to read and users will bounce off your website too quickly to garner any authority from them. As a result, it’s important to mention a keyword within the acceptable parameters of SEO best practices while ensuring that the article sounds like it is organically written with the reader’s best interests in mind.

Keyword Placement

Where you place your keywords is just as important as how often they’re used within a page—and there’s a big difference between the two. Above all your content must be relevant to your business and your website and your keywords should match. But your keywords should be peppered throughout the copy without stuffing them in where they don’t make sense. Search engines are looking for semantics today; they want to make sure that your content is relevant to those who searched for your site in the first place. And if it’s not? Your visitors will bounce off your site, hurting your authority in the eyes of the search engines.

In general, your keywords should appear in the first and last 100 words of your page, in the meta description, your page title and your h-tags. But if your keywords are too broad, they’re not going to do you any good. And if you use the same one to three keywords too often, readers will quickly bore. Use synonyms and alternative words and phrases that make your copy interesting to read. You can find out which words will get you the best ROI through a quality keyword analysis.

Keyword Analysis

The road to your website all begins with a search. What words are people typing into the search box that help drive them to your site? Choosing your keywords is one of the most crucial steps in composing SEO content and content marketing depends on nuanced keyword analysis. You need to figure out what people are typing into search engines and how your competitors currently rank on the keywords you’re interested in targeting. Keyword analysis is the cornerstone of conversion rates because it is how you ensure that you don’t just get visitors to your site, but the right visitors.

Making sense of the data involved with keyword analysis is an art and a science. Quantitatively measuring the results of keyword analysis is crucial. You need to look at total searches, cost-per-click, current SERP position, total monthly value, average conversion rate, incremental projected potential purchases, average order value (AOV), projected clicks/month, projected incremental monthly revenue, targeting potential, and competition percentage.

But crunching the numbers needs to be complemented by a more qualitative reason test. There is an art to discerning which keywords should find a home on your website. Let the intuition about what looks, sounds and feels right help to guide your keyword analysis as well as a consultation with SEO experts who can help guide you. But in the end, don’t let the data get ahead of what is already a good article for your targeted customers.

Relevance

Content relevance is significant to your audience and the search engine. A website’s content needs to appeal to the people searching for your product, service or offering. And the search engine needs to find that content for the user. Determining relevance is actually quite simple and can be summed up with the answer to one particularly striking question:

“How appropriate is your content for both your audience and your website?” Answering this question gets down to the fundamentals of what makes good content. Essentially, you’re determining the worthiness of your content to the Internet-viewing public; you’re becoming your own best critic, putting yourself in the shoes of the search engines and their respective users. Writing content in an effort to simply create content isn’t good for SEO. Your audience is smarter than that and so, frankly, are the search engines. The best way to increase your organic search traffic is to give Google, Yahoo and Bing what they want: quality, relevant content.

Understanding relevance is important because search engines and users are not fooled by poor content filled to the brim with keywords. If the content does not provide valuable information for the user, then it might as well not exist. The search engines will detect the keyword spam or your audience will recognize that the content is meaningless. Think about your audience and write for them first, with your specific product or service in mind, and relevance will take care of itself.

If you struggle with relevant topics to write about, look no further than the Internet and your current customers. What are people asking about? What do they need to know? What do you wish your new customers knew about your industry (or product or service), before they come to you? All of those answers make great beginnings to blogs, articles and even evergreen text for your website.

For example, if you’re managing the website of a personal injury law firm, you may want to find subtopics so that you’re not spouting off inconsequentially about personal injury in general. After checking out some related blogs and informational sites, you may find that people are interested in subtopics like “slip and fall accidents,” “dog bites,” or “what do to after an auto accident.” This method of specificity will help you with honing in on your subtopic’s specificity.

Quality

To set yourself up in the best possible light with your audience and the major search engines, your content must be of high quality. Allocating extra time and resources to an article can be the difference between conversion success and conversion failure. With an ever-increasing content-hungry Internet audience, the competition for users’ attention will only become more formidable.

As a content producer, it is your job to ensure you’re doing everything possible to deliver high-quality content to your users. Doing so will help you with many aspects of your campaign: your click-through rates (CTRs) will increase, your bounce rates will drop, your users’ average time-on-site will increase and your conversion rates will increase. Not only that, but you’ll also be the go-to person for all things related to your industry. Since writing quality and writing style can be highly subjective areas, putting the right people and processes in place are the key to ensuring your content is high-caliber stuff that people will actually care about.

Quality content is well written and provides actual, important information which also includes appropriate keywords, meeting the user’s needs while balancing keyword targeting. Here’s the long and short of it, the most important thing you need to understand: write for humans, optimize for robots. What do humans want? They want answers to questions. They want value, information and new insights. Search engines prefer the natural content that users want to read, so anything that looks like it was written for a search bot is only harmful for your website.

The quality of your content will be the difference between conversion success and conversion failure. The competition for attention on the Internet is constantly increasing, which actually serves to raise the demand for quality content that is worth the user’s time. It’s up to content producers to ensure they are doing everything possible to deliver quality content.

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