HTML For SEO

Page Text (Copy), H1 Tag, Meta Description, Page Title, Image Name, Alt Text, Page Name (File Name)

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HTML For SEO


Google eats data for breakfast lunch and dinner, and your website is an endless all-you-can-eat buffet. You need to fully optimize your website for the data points that Google passes out, pushing you higher on the search engine response pages. To optimize your website for Google, a refined process of compiling, analyzing and implementing technical specifications is essential to your success. SEO implementation requires that you use the best practices to improve your rank and increase traffic. Of course, there are tried and true methods of SEO, specifically involving HTML, that will help you find your way through the SEO maze. HTML is much more complex than just buying a domain name, slapping up some content and maybe sharing links with a few people.

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HTML For SEO

What is HTML?


HTML, or hypertext markup language, is the specific code that controls things like how a website looks to your visitors, where your website’s links take you and what source something comes from. It’s the basic language of web development, but it is also very useful in a marketing campaign. Why, you ask? Well, HTML code can be attached to keywords, images and other content on a website that can send it directly to your landing page.

HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO
HTML For SEO

Page Text

One of the most effective ways to use HTML to increase your SEO is to embed HTML into your page text or content. There are, of course, many options for page content, from text, videos, images, audio, embedded links and formatting. Consider the last time you tried to save an image and insert it into a Word document. Aside from being incredibly frustrated (that’s neither here nor there), you were using HTML to transfer an image because that link is embedded into the image and you placed the link to the content into a document.

HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO
HTML For SEO

H1 Tags

Arguably, H1 tags may be the most important item out of anything you do, SEO or not. Think about it. Do you click on an article with a crappy headline? Do you buy a book with a bad title? No. Using a good, attention-grabbing H1 (header title) with appropriate keywords will get you more hits than anything else. Make sure this is the largest text in your article (or post, content or page), and preferably at the top of the page.

HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO
HTML For SEO

Meta Description and Title Tags

Meta descriptions are the text that appear below the links of search engine results. It includes a short description of the page and bolded keywords to help users determine if the site is a good match for what they were looking for. This is helpful because you don’t have to open a link and browse to see if it fits your needs—you can check out a preview before you click.

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HTML For SEO

Page Title

Page title, often confused with the H1 tag, is a crucial aspect of keyword utilization. Not only is the page title, well, the title of the page, but it is also present in the URL (if you’re doing your job right), and the name of the tab or window you’ve opened for a specific site. The page title is also present in the “bread crumbs,” those links that show you how far you’ve gone through a website, like Home > Products > Water Heaters, with each section being a different page title. Keyword analysis is crucial to this aspect of HTML for SEO, as without a page title that relates to the keyword search, the odds that you “win” the click decrease dramatically.

HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO
HTML For SEO

Image Names

File names and file naming convention (FNC) are a crucial part of a higher-tiered SEO process. Essentially, it is a system by which you consistently name your files, whether text, images, video, audio, etc. for both organizational purposes and for SEO integration. When you use the right FNC, and insert the right keywords into your image (or other) file name, you are drastically increasing the chances that your content can be seen through search engines rather than just via your website.

HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO
HTML For SEO

Alt Text (Images)

Alt text, or alternative text, is also sometimes referred to as the alt attribute. Alt text is important in providing tags and descriptions for images based on the browser, and you can then see the platform of the image. This is HTML code that allows users, whether visually impaired or who can’t get a page to load, to know what the photo content is.

HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO HTML For SEO
HTML For SEO

Page File Name

Finally launching your website into cyberspace after so much intense planning and analysis, you and your business partners are bound to feel relief and elation. The website is done, people will find it and all will be well, right? Well, you should definitely enjoy the original launch, as it is very exciting. However, launching your website is not the end of website development—it’s only the beginning.

What is HTML?

HTML, or hypertext markup language, is the specific code that controls things like how a website looks to your visitors, where your website’s links take you and what source something comes from. It’s the basic language of web development, but it is also very useful in a marketing campaign. Why, you ask? Well, HTML code can be attached to keywords, images and other content on a website that can send it directly to your landing page.

With the right HTML code approach, using SEO keywords and proper implementation, you can increase your reach across a wide variety of mediums. Doing this will increase your website traffic, including targeted traffic, which can result in a boost in your list subscribers, and eventually, your sales. That’s what we’re all out here doing, right? Trying to skyrocket our bottom line? Let’s do it. HTML for SEO can help.

Page Text

One of the most effective ways to use HTML to increase your SEO is to embed HTML into your page text or content. There are, of course, many options for page content, from text, videos, images, audio, embedded links and formatting. Consider the last time you tried to save an image and insert it into a Word document. Aside from being incredibly frustrated (that’s neither here nor there), you were using HTML to transfer an image because that link is embedded into the image and you placed the link to the content into a document.

Web developers also use this feature to copy specific functions of a website by copying their HTML code that enables a specific feature. For example, let’s say you find another website that has a layout you are fond of. You can access the site’s HTML code and scroll through the various “sentences” until you find the part that creates the look you want. This takes a little more nuance and know-how than other HTML options, though. There is also a cool new feature with many larger websites to prevent plagiarism issues, which essentially hyperlinks all text, so that if it is ever copied and pasted into another document or website (usually in comments), the link to the original source is embedded into the document. This helps more people get to your website. They will see the link to your website at the bottom of the copied and pasted text, so they know where to go to read more about what they are interested in.

In addition to all of the cool things that page text can provide for web developers to increase your SEO, it is important to maintain the basics of your marketing strategy as well. First and foremost, page text is the most crucial place to use keywords, obviously. Within any type of page or information, keywords can be used at a certain density to maximize the odds of popping up in search results. It is important to know that without HTML inside the page text, SEO has a very hard time thriving. Think about it—without links, tags or keywords laced throughout the content, what does SEO have to work with? What data can Google and other search engines use to rank your site on search results?

H1 Tags

Arguably, H1 tags may be the most important item out of anything you do, SEO or not. Think about it. Do you click on an article with a crappy headline? Do you buy a book with a bad title? No. Using a good, attention-grabbing H1 (header title) with appropriate keywords will get you more hits than anything else. Make sure this is the largest text in your article (or post, content or page), and preferably at the top of the page. Insert tagged keywords that have been analyzed through keyword programs and have higher rankings. H1 titles are the ones that are blasted across your social media shares, search engine results and URL links. While content matters to your keyword density, your H1 tag is capable of getting you clicks that are not even related to searches and SEO. That’s a big deal, and one you should use as much as possible.

Meta Description and Title Tags

Meta descriptions are the text that appear below the links of search engine results. It includes a short description of the page and bolded keywords to help users determine if the site is a good match for what they were looking for. This is helpful because you don’t have to open a link and browse to see if it fits your needs—you can check out a preview before you click.

Most websites do provide search engines with their desired meta description, using title tags, but sometimes search engines have a mind of their own and will take snippets from the website to use in ways believed to be most relevant to the searcher. That doesn’t mean you should forego a meta description—they help immensely and can increase your SEO ranking if you have the right bolded keywords that match up with someone’s search. To use a meta description properly, web developers insert <title>title into their code, and use 55 characters or less to give the link a title, which shows up in the search engine. Keywords need to be at the beginning of the title code, and other identifiers, like the business name, need to be at the end. For example <title>title water heater repair Denver Plumber <title>title. Using a meta tag can mean the difference between showing up in the search results, having the user click on the link to your website, browsing your website or not ever knowing that your website exists because it didn’t come up in their search results.

Page Title

Page title, often confused with the H1 tag, is a crucial aspect of keyword utilization. Not only is the page title, well, the title of the page, but it is also present in the URL (if you’re doing your job right), and the name of the tab or window you’ve opened for a specific site. The page title is also present in the “bread crumbs,” those links that show you how far you’ve gone through a website, like Home > Products > Water Heaters, with each section being a different page title. Keyword analysis is crucial to this aspect of HTML for SEO, as without a page title that relates to the keyword search, the odds that you “win” the click decrease dramatically.

Image Names

File names and file naming convention (FNC) are a crucial part of a higher-tiered SEO process. Essentially, it is a system by which you consistently name your files, whether text, images, video, audio, etc. for both organizational purposes and for SEO integration. When you use the right FNC, and insert the right keywords into your image (or other) file name, you are drastically increasing the chances that your content can be seen through search engines rather than just via your website. This relates to HTML because an image can provide a link directly to your website, so no matter where a person finds your image or other media, they can click it, and the link will send them to your landing page. Consider Google Images or Pinterest—each have their search function that only shows images (or videos), but when you open the thumbnail, you are sent to the owner’s landing page. People can search via platforms like Google Images and Pinterest for keywords found in your file names, and then they click through to your page. Voila! More traffic.

Alt Text (Images)

Alt text, or alternative text, is also sometimes referred to as the alt attribute. Alt text is important in providing tags and descriptions for images based on the browser, and you can then see the platform of the image. This is HTML code that allows users, whether visually impaired or who can’t get a page to load, to know what the photo content is. No more sitting there wondering, “What does that loading image look like? Oh, the suspense!” Use keywords in this alt text as a way to boost searches, and to provide a description of the content that will explain more about its landing page and what you provide on your website. There are a couple of tips to maximize your alt attribution, which is something that will separate you from the herd.

  • Use short descriptions
  • Use keywords, but only in the proper density
  • Mention your page name or website
  • If it’s a product image, describe it accurately

Similar to image and other filenames, alt text helps you increase your chances of an image leading to more traffic back to your website. While many other people utilize the basics of HTML, alt text is fairly simple but can exponentially grow your traffic.

Page File Name

Page file names are similar to the image file discussion, like how you label your files can greatly affect your SEO and traffic in the long run. With page files, you’re naming what people see in their links and URL bar. You’ve got a keyword analysis by now, so use it. Insert appropriate keywords in the appropriate order into your page filename, and make sure that becomes your URL. You don’t want a page entitled www.website.com/blog that pops up as a link titled www.website.com/a13d95 or something similar. Depending on which platform you use to create your website, this is incredibly simple HTML and will net you greater SEO outcomes. Just like with alt attributes, though, there are a few recommendations for getting the most out of your page filenames.

  • The shorter the better
  • Use keywords
  • URL needs to match page name
  • Separate words with hyphens (-) not underscores (_)

It is important when using HTML like this to boost your SEO ranking, that you always stay “white hat,” meaning you’re using your keywords and analytics for good rather than evil. White hat means your keyword density is normal; you’re using keywords that apply to your content (Sorry, you can’t use keyword “kittens” all over your site about indoor plumbing!) and you’re not spamming your links or cloaking them (inserting misleading images or anchor text).

HTML is so much more complex than what can be listed here; this is just a basic overview of all the potential options for creating an even better SEO strategy. HTML is also a lesser-used component of SEO because it does require more knowledge and involvement than basic analysis and implementation. The endgame here is to ensure that you’ve put your best foot forward. As elementary as some of these changes are, they are critical to success. Surprisingly enough, most websites do not even have the most basic SEO attributes optimized, and HTML will definitely set you apart from the competition.

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