Page Title SEO


The Importance of the Page Title


It is incredibly important not to underestimate the power of the page title on your website. Not only does an easy-to-implement page title get you more hits because it’s memorable or concise, but it also helps your search engine ranking. Think about it: If someone searches for “best piano bar in Austin,” and the title of your web page is “Best Piano Bars Austin,” odds are you’re going to get more hits than your competition. The page title is basic HTML, and can increase your search engine optimization dramatically.

Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO
Page Title SEO

Title vs. Name

It is important to note that there are differences between page names and page titles. Page names are found on a website’s menu, where you have locations like “Services,” “About Us” and so on. The page title is specific to HTML and search engines because it is (generally) the name that pops up as the title link in Google and other search engines

Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO
Page Title SEO

Optimal Page Titles

A great page title falls into the “Goldilocks Zone” of HTML; not too short, not too long. This is different for each page and depends quite a bit on the content itself. However, if the page title is too short, or doesn’t contain any keywords, it may not give enough data for search engines to pull from. On the other hand, if it is too long or too packed with keywords, it’s going to be less desirable in user searches.

Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO
Page Title SEO

Appropriate HTML for Titles

HTML, obviously a language unto itself, is very specific and can help or hurt your SEO just by the way you separate out text or which order you place text in. For page titles, of course, the necessary first step is including the <title>title section in HTML; without this important section, the document will just be coded gibberish and will not translate into an actual website. That’s how important the page title is! There are also a few other tips to create the best title tag for your page.

Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO Page Title SEO
Page Title SEO

Titles May Change Over Time

It’s imperative to note here that Google, and a few other search engines, will overlook your page title if they find a better snippet from your content that applies more to a search query. This means that if you title your web page “Best Pianos Bars in Austin” in your title code, but someone searches for “piano bars in Austin,” Google will most likely show “Piano Bars in Austin” as your page title. While this isn’t necessarily a bad thing in this instance, it shows that sometimes even the best coding just goes to waste. Because of this, you may have to “roll with the punches,” and be willing to rewrite your title tag to reflect more of what gets you hits on a search engine. This is not labor intensive but means you should keep up on your search hits and keyword analysis.

Page Title Matters


You know how you’re not supposed to judge a book by its cover? Well, we all do, and the same goes for websites. The page title is arguably the most important part of your HTML approach to SEO. When a search engine user reads your page title, they are asking themselves, “Does this fit my needs? Is this what I’m looking for?” They are mostly judging your book (web page) by the cover (page title). Additionally, if the title tag is formatted incorrectly or doesn’t contain the proper keywords, search engines will not pull them when a particular keyword or phrase is queried. If your page title isn’t formatted correctly, you’re also missing out on improved page rankings. It’s pretty obvious that HTML and your page title are crucial to your online presence, and can help you with your marketing strategy and conversion rates.

Title vs. Name

It is important to note that there are differences between page names and page titles. Page names are found on a website’s menu, where you have locations like “Services,” “About Us” and so on. The page title is specific to HTML and search engines because it is (generally) the name that pops up as the title link in Google and other search engines

Search engines read the HTML code, <title> text goes here </title>, and places the text where it belongs. The page title is also what you see on the tab name in a browser window, or at the top of your window depending on which Internet browser you’re using. A page title seems like a fairly simple part of creating content (what website wouldn’t have a page title?), but it can also be used in a specific way to help.

Optimal Page Titles

A great page title falls into the “Goldilocks Zone” of HTML; not too short, not too long. This is different for each page and depends quite a bit on the content itself. However, if the page title is too short, or doesn’t contain any keywords, it may not give enough data for search engines to pull from. On the other hand, if it is too long or too packed with keywords, it’s going to be less desirable in user searches. Which is more appealing: “Texas: Best Piano Bars” or “Texas: The Coolest, Cheapest, Most Fun Piano Bars with Great Happy Hours”? You’d pick the shorter one, right? And it would probably be closer to what you’d search for, and, therefore, match your direct query much better. Mainly, keep it short and neat. When trying to optimize your page title, keep in mind:

  • Aim for 55-65 characters
  • Use keywords (but only as needed)
  • Leave out fillers (and, then, the, but)
  • Page titles should always differ from headers (the bold font at the top of content)
    • This is also important in HTML code, as <title> and <header> are very different

Appropriate HTML for Titles

HTML, obviously a language unto itself, is very specific and can help or hurt your SEO just by the way you separate out text or which order you place text in. For page titles, of course, the necessary first step is including the <title> section in HTML; without this important section, the document will just be coded gibberish and will not translate into an actual website. That’s how important the page title is! There are also a few other tips to create the best title tag for your page.

  • Put the most important keywords first
    • If you run over the 55-65 character rule, at least keywords will show first
  • Do not repeat keywords over and over
    • Use phrases including keywords
    • Ex: “Best Piano Bars Austin,” avoid: “Piano Bar Austin Piano bar”
  • Company name (if you’re using one) goes at the end
    • Ex: “Best Piano Bars in Austin – Pete’s Piano Bar”
  • Leave out characters like *, !, &, or anything else that isn’t text or grammar-related
  • Do not reuse page titles for different pages
    • Each page title on your site must be unique!
  • Don’t forget: Title is different than header
    • Use your title in <title> insert text </title>
    • If you insert the text into <header>, your page will show up as “Untitled” in a search engine. Seriously.

Titles May Change Over Time

It’s imperative to note here that Google, and a few other search engines, will overlook your page title if they find a better snippet from your content that applies more to a search query. This means that if you title your web page “Best Pianos Bars in Austin” in your title code, but someone searches for “piano bars in Austin,” Google will most likely show “Piano Bars in Austin” as your page title. While this isn’t necessarily a bad thing in this instance, it shows that sometimes even the best coding just goes to waste. Because of this, you may have to “roll with the punches,” and be willing to rewrite your title tag to reflect more of what gets you hits on a search engine. This is not labor intensive but means you should keep up on your search hits and keyword analysis.

Subscribe to the SEO Expert Newsletter

Receive SEO tips, ideas, & best practices

Be the first in your vertical to use cutting edge SEO.

Sign Up