Managing Your Domain


Domain management sounds very fancy and slightly intimidating, but in reality, it is just keeping track of your domain names (websites) and the services that host them. Once you’ve got a domain, you’ve already made a huge step in your web presence. Purchasing a domain means that you have reserved that name for a specific amount of time (usually a year), and you will also have to pay a hosting service (a company that puts your website on the Internet) to keep your spot in cyberspace for a specific amount of time (1 to 3 years usually).

It is usually from these hosting services websites that you manage your domains, and many providers have very user-friendly interfaces when it comes to this aspect of website ownership. These hosting services also provide a number of additional services, whether paid or free, that help you once you’ve purchased your site. Once you’ve paid for your domain and host service, it’s time to set up your website and starting managing your domain.

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Domain Management

Registration and Management

The most simple, and arguably the most important, aspect of managing your domain is keeping your domain updated. This means ensuring that your name is accurate, your payment methods are up to date and you have your domain name registered within the management website. You should also set up basic webmail, which is email from your website. Depending on the nature of the domain, whether it is an ecommerce site, resource or personal blog, you can add any number of plugins for additional flexibility and a more valuable user experience.

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Domain Management

Domain Privacy

You should also be aware of your hosting service’s domain privacy. Many times, you will pay an extra monthly or yearly cost to keep your personal information private, but some services offer this as a free perk. Whichever host you use, always ensure that you use domain privacy protection so that nobody will have access to your basic contact information without your permission.

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Domain Management

Understanding Site Traffic

The main reason for creating a public website is to make it publicly accessible, right? Well if you’re new to the domain management game, understanding site traffic can be overwhelming. As mentioned before, there are plenty of plugins to help you see visitor count. Many website builders and domain management software will also show you where in the world your views are coming from (by country), what time of the day people are viewing your site and where they’re finding your website. This is important information if you’re hoping to get more traffic. You can see where the most views are coming from, which is usually from social media or search engines, and can then optimize your marketing tactics to either one or both visitor sources.

Hosting Privacy and Spam Protection


Another important aspect of your hosting service (and why you pay your monthly or yearly fees) is their privacy and spam protection. Unfortunately, there will be a number of spammers who attempt to hack your login page to access the information on your site (client lists, social media accounts, etc.). If your hosting service is worth its salt, these attempts will be prevented. However, even the best hosting services have weak spots, and hackers are really good at what they do. There have even been cases where hackers steal entire websites and begin operating under the guise of the original owner! To prevent this, we can’t emphasize enough the power of a great password. Here are some tips to keeping your site safe:

Domain Management

Use those numbers

Use those numbers, symbols, and capital letters; hackers can’t predict those, which is ideal even if it is harder for you to remember.

Domain Management

Change your password

Change your password frequently, and especially if your hosting server lets you know that you’ve had more false login attempts than usual.

Domain Management

Beware of email scams

Beware of email or login scams, which look like legitimate emails from your hosting service. These are designed to get you to login to your account, and then the hackers will have all your information. Simply ensure that the URL is the actual website you intend to use, rather than just relying on a link taking you where you want to go.

Domain Management

Privacy features

Always pay for or turn on your privacy features on your domain management or hosting service website; this is totally worth it, and will save you a bunch of trouble.

Domain Management

Locking your domain

If you’re comfortable locking your domain (meaning you can’t transfer to a different provider or change anything on the administrative level), you can prevent someone from virtually stealing your site and information.

These tips aren’t guaranteed to keep your site completely safe; the best thing you can do is properly manage your domain to keep an eye on things. If you notice emails citing changes you didn’t make to your site or your domain, immediately login (to the real site) and change your passwords and contact the customer service department of your hosting or domain service. They can help you take the next steps in preventing another successful hack. If your website does get hacked or hijacked, the odds of you getting back are very low. Take the right steps to prevent this, and be aware of your account changes.

Domain Management

Keeping Tabs on Subdomains or Subfolders

Domain Management

Transferring and Consolidating

Prepare for Challenges


Anyone who has ever built and launched a website knows that nothing ever goes as smoothly as is expected. Being ready for when things go wrong—or having support to walk you through it—can help your stress levels and your recovery time.

With domain management, sometimes you may accidentally delete an entire website and have to ask your hosting service to recover it for you. Yes, that happens. Sometimes, you may spend hours playing with plugins to only then find out that you don’t need any of them. Other times, you may be frustrated by repeated blocked attempts by potential hackers or by spam comments on your blog.

Keep in mind that everyone with a domain has experienced these frustrations (and more), so there are plenty of resources when you need help fixing a problem. The important thing to keep in mind is that your domain security is the most crucial aspect of your domain management process, even ahead of finding new visitors and increasing traffic. There’s no point in having visitors if your website has been stolen from under your feet. Prepare for hacking attempts, increase your security and then work on the rest. Prepare for SEO functions by performing site analyses through the major search engines, and then you can manage your content much more easily moving forward. Also, make sure to troubleshoot and analyze your website building service or hosting service to make sure that they’re doing the most they can for you.

When you take the time to plan your website, the management part is incredibly easy. After a while, once you’re comfortable with your control panel and all the aspects of management, you will find yourself navigating easily through the realm of domain management and website ownership.

Registration and Management

The most simple, and arguably the most important, aspect of managing your domain is keeping your domain updated. This means ensuring that your name is accurate, your payment methods are up to date and you have your domain name registered within the management website. You should also set up basic webmail, which is email from your website. Depending on the nature of the domain, whether it is an ecommerce site, resource or personal blog, you can add any number of plugins for additional flexibility and a more valuable user experience. Plugins are great “software” that you can install into your website to help you keep track of things like visitors, fonts to spruce up the site, contact form boxes and more. Your hosting website or even the site designer you use will have quite a few plugins from which to choose.

Domain Privacy

You should also be aware of your hosting service’s domain privacy. Many times, you will pay an extra monthly or yearly cost to keep your personal information private, but some services offer this as a free perk. Whichever host you use, always ensure that you use domain privacy protection so that nobody will have access to your basic contact information without your permission.

A website owner should also understand the Domain Name System (DNS), which assigns the domain name to a specific IP address. This is essentially your location in cyberspace. You can set up your IP address to always source your website to one computer or address, allowing you to work from any computer or location and still have it sent to the original location. DNS can also affect a number of files in your domain and any changes you make to your account may take a while to show up on your DNS account, but that’s more complicated than basic management. The most important part of basic management is understanding how to control your domain from the hosting server or website builder’s control panels. After you’ve played around with these different settings in your domain hosting site, or your domain management software, you’re ready to move on to the next step.

Understanding Site Traffic

The main reason for creating a public website is to make it publicly accessible, right? Well if you’re new to the domain management game, understanding site traffic can be overwhelming. As mentioned before, there are plenty of plugins to help you see visitor count. Many website builders and domain management software will also show you where in the world your views are coming from (by country), what time of the day people are viewing your site and where they’re finding your website. This is important information if you’re hoping to get more traffic. You can see where the most views are coming from, which is usually from social media or search engines, and can then optimize your marketing tactics to either one or both visitor sources.

Keeping Tabs on Subdomains or Subfolders

Once you’ve mastered your original, primary domain, you may find yourself wondering how to leverage a subdomain to build out your business or drive more traffic to your website. Essentially, a subdomain is a prefix on your URL that organizes your website and allows easier access to different sections in your website. For example, if your website is www.website.com, you can add blog.website.com to send people to your blog without first visiting the main page. This also works for shop.website.com, resources.website.com and so on. Subdomains do not usually cost extra money (depending on the site building or hosting service you use), and can be added simply by going to your domain or hosting service and adding subdomains under the domain you wish to utilize.

If you have a large website, a subdomain can have its own IP address, which is part of the Domain Name System mentioned before. This means that any updates made to that specific subdomain can be traced to a different IP address or location than the main page and other subdomains. Subdomains are entirely different from subfolders, which are allocated by URLs like www.website.com/blog, and are sourced from the same IP address as the original domain name. The main difference is the level of traffic you desire or expect for your site.

Subdomains allow better “load bearing” for the host service, meaning that if your website gets a lot of traffic, subdomains allow it to process visitors and maintain speeds easily. If you have a low-traffic level site, subfolders (also called subpages) are perfectly fine. However, subdomains are ideal for search engine optimization functions, and allow people searching major engines to find your domains and subdomains easily. This requires a lot of upkeep on the technical end, adding keywords and site mapping so that these search engines can utilize your information properly. If you only want a simple domain for your blog or small business, subfolders will work great.

Transferring and Consolidating

Many people sign up with a specific website building program or hosting service provider because the introductory rates are incredibly affordable and sometimes even free. However, this is only for the initial term (1 to 3 years), and then the rates rise exponentially. Some people believe that the service they use is worth a higher fee, while others end up biting the bullet just because they don’t know that they can transfer their domains between hosts.

Don’t lose money anymore, because now you know that you can transfer and consolidate domains through other hosts onto new host sites. All major host sites have an “Add existing domain” function somewhere in their management account. All you have to do is add the proper domain name and administration information, pay the necessary fees and you will have your original domain on a newer (better, more affordable, more flexible) hosting site.

If you’re one of those people who wants to test out all the possible providers before deciding on which one you will remain loyal to, you can also consolidate domain names under one server. Each domain may have its own fee schedule, different usernames and logins, and are generally more difficult to manage when they’re spread all across cyberspace. Save yourself some sanity, time and money and combine them all under the host provider you like most (or is most affordable, whichever is most important to you).

Once you’ve clicked “Add existing domain” in your host’s administration panel for each of your domains, you can further increase your security by locking those domains from being transferred again until you’re ready. Whether it’s for money, convenience or both, it is very easy to house all of your domains under the same service once you’ve learned how.

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